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Forum Question about Corel Draw licence


DESIGNER

Zveronika
2019-05-09

Corel Draw users probably noticed that Corel is sending messages about potential possibility that programs we are using are against their license of usage.
I am trying to figured out what are the exact rules in program usage. We bought it as a firm, in fact we are buying it for years now, and I thought we can use it freely.
Now I am reading on the internet that one serial number can be used just by one person. But this is stupid... should owner of the firm buy Corel Draw for every employee!? Or there is some limit of the number of computers where Corel Draw can be installed?
My boss said that he will send them a serial number and hopefully we will find an invoice.
But still, I don't know what to expect and I would like to know if anyone understands their license rules?



ADMIN
ajleroux
2019-05-09

Hi Zveronika,

As I understand it, it is one license per user. If I want two employees to use CorelDraw, I have to buy two licenses, one license for each of them. But Corel has different licensing options and it is not very clear from their site how multi-user licensing works. Best if your boss speaks to them directly.



DESIGNER
Ortega Graphics
2019-05-09

Hello,

The way licensing works is very clearly indicated on Corel's EULA (End User License Agreement). So, yes, it is basically: one license = one computer. There are a few exceptions indicated, like when a user has two computers (but that one user can not use the two computers at the same time). All this can be read in the first six paragraphs:
https://www.corel.com/en/eula/

They offer discounts when a small business buys multiple licenses for employees; they don't list prices, you have to request a consultation.
https://www.coreldraw.com/en/licensing/business/

Hope this helps,

Ortega Graphics



DESIGNER
Zveronika
2019-05-09

Thank you for your fast answer @Ajleroux. Yes, we will probably go with multi-user licensing if this is a option too. I suppose this will be something cheaper then one program for each user.





DESIGNER
Zveronika
2019-05-09

@ Ortega, thank you!
The thing is, I couldn't believed that number is 1:1. It's written on some other place that one license is for three computers, so I wasn't sure what to think.
Thank you for the consultation link also, we will write to them.



DESIGNER
Ortega Graphics
2019-05-09

It seems that the 1:3 license was an option in previous EULA's and it was only for personal use, and again, the user was only able to use one computer at a time. Currently, there is a limited option for employees to install on a computer at home using the employer's license (and again, as long as the employee is using one of the two computer at one time (home or work)), some restrictions apply.

I recently saw this list of alternatives to Adobe products:
https://boingboing.net/2019/05/07/replacements-for-adobe-apps.html

Seems very interesting, particularly because some of those are open source (free in both senses of the word; as in "free beer" and free as in "free speech").

This list (and other options in the comments there) might help some people.

Ortega Graphics



DESIGNER
sculptor
2019-05-09

Anybody had experience with free alternatives? I'm not talking about some fancy special effects but can you generate industry standard eps files?

From what I know Adobe does its best to force every designer to use Illustrator. Corel is a bit friendlier but eps files are not always compliant.



DESIGNER
Zveronika
2019-05-10

@Sculptor, at my knowledge, there is some problem with CMYK colors in Inkscape. Otherwise, I think this isn't a bad program, but I don't know if someone on internet offered a solution to skip this problem.

I have contacted Corel and waiting for their answer. We will continue to use Corel Draw at every cost, I can not live without it! :D
My boss said to me that I should write to them that we are using and paying Corel programs from X5, but I don't think this fact will make them sentimental in their price offer, ha ha!



DESIGNER
logofish
2019-05-11

A pretty good program is Affinity Designer. It isn't free, but it's much cheaper in comparison with Illustrator / Corel Draw, and it offers a good range of tools. There's a free trial if one wants to test it; I don't know however if the eps files are 100% compliant.

What's even more interesting is that they are now offering a version for iPad!



ADMIN
ajleroux
2019-05-11

Thanks logofish, I'm downloading Affinity Designer now. It looks promising.



ADMIN
ajleroux
2019-05-11

I am really impressed.

1. It is fast. On my computer it is much, much faster than CorelDraw 2018.
2. It has most of the features that I use in CorelDraw.
3. It has features I wish CorelDraw had.
4. Purchase price is one tenth of CorelDraw!
5. It can't export to CDR, but export to EPS (and other formats) seems to work fine.
6. It can't open CDR files, but you can save your CDR files as AI/EPS, then open in Affinity.
7. Lots of customization options, including custom keyboard shortcuts.

https://affinity.serif.com/en-us/designer/desktop/
Free trial link is at the bottom.



DESIGNER
logofish
2019-05-12

Yes, it's good! If I wasn't forced to use the Adobe suite for other reasons, I would have ditched it since the playing field (with Affinity designer&photo, and other apps for web design) is slowing starting to level out.



DESIGNER
sculptor
2019-05-13

Thanks for the update on vector editors. It' s good to know there is something available for students who can't afford buying commercial software.

Zveronika, I'm also a Corel guy and I know next to nothing about AI. However I don't like how this companies held us hostages by dirty marketing tricks. Currently there are so many purchasing plans for Corel that nuclear physics seems to be simpler to catch on.

In 10 years of my computer graphic design I started from using all possible effects to pretty basic functions of Corel. I'm coming to conclusion that I don't need any software updates till I die. Editing vector images is about efficiency of communication between computer and human. Having an array of keyboard shortcuts for almost every operation cuts time spent by computer screen. I don't need much more.



ADMIN
ajleroux
2019-05-13

I am also a long-time Corel user and a big fan. I recently upgraded to Windows 10 and my beloved old CorelDraw x3 no longer worked. It simply does not run on Windows 10. I bought CorelDraw 2018 and I was disappointed. It may be a hardware issue on my computer, but every time I click something I have to wait for CorelDraw to think about it. It became frustrating to the point where I started to avoid doing design work.

I tried Affinity Designer and it works beautifully. Super fast, on the same computer. To be fair, it also struggled with my 2,700 installed fonts, but not as much as CorelDraw. I reduced my installed fonts to about 1,000 and now it works well.

I spent the weekend experimenting and changing settings and I have it set up so that it feels a lot like CorelDraw. I can work again without pulling my hair out.



DESIGNER
Zveronika
2019-05-15

@Logofish, after you told us for this cheaper program and @ajleroux, as a Corel user, confirmed it is fine, I think I will buy it for my niece if she will want and had time to continue to practice logo design. In all that mess with Corel Draw I was mostly sorry for her, because I have installed Corel at my mom's house, so I can teach her on Saturdays when we all gather at my mom's home.
Poor little kid practiced almost every Saturday for the past year and a half, we waited her 18 birthday so she can upload some logos here and now I had to told her that she can not use Corel Draw anymore.

@Sculptor, if you don't have to, don't even try to contact them. Corel, I mean. They are playing ping-pong with me almost a week now...
Yes, I agree that we don't need some program with many option. I would also like to froze my computer, my graphic program, my mobile phone and not to change it till the rest of my life, ha ha!

That's why I admire @ajleroux how he can switch to another program just like that.



DESIGNER
sculptor
2019-05-15

Zveronika, Your urge to stay with the same software is quite healthy in my view. Learning new things is good but choosing what to learn is a key. If new software can save your time or give you more capabilities it's worth of learning. If not you can as well play chess.

Ajleroux, you had a reason to update Corel because old version didn't work with new system. Actually you paid twice: for Windows and for Corel. Finally Corel didn't work as expected. You probably needed new Windows to take proper care of logoground. I don't have so many duties so I'm planning to stay with Windows 7 as long as computer stays alive. This system is perfectly stable and efficient when it comes to my usage pattern.

When I used to edit videos (Adobe Premier) having newest software and newest computer was a key to smooth workflow. With growing resolution computing power had to grow. Logo design is very special because on the basic level it's very simple math.

When we design logo we simply tell computer where to put knots and how to bend the curve between them. Simple math creates best logos. We will be able to use this software and hardware to the end if only Adobe and Corel will let us. New versions create files that are not understood by older versions. Recently I found funny thing: I can open new version of ai file in old Corel Draw (with some errors) but I can't open the same ai file in a bit older Adobe Illustrator. That means they spoil in on purpose.

"Update culture" is strongly tied to planned obsolescence. Profit oriented economy creates goods designed to expire. First widely known example was an incandescence electric bulb (the traditional one). It was made on purpose to last no more than 1000 hours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoebus_cartel



DESIGNER
TomLon
2019-05-15

Xara is my definitive choice for the last 10 years.

- Ferrari for everyone else. :)
- All in one
- Import / Export of all known formats
- Perfection in the vectors
- And many more useful features ...

It all depends on personal affinity and needs. Xara is the best for me.



ADMIN
ajleroux
2019-05-15

TomLon, I have experimented with Xara Page & Layout Designer. Is that what you use? They have different programs and it isn't clear to me which one would be best for logo design.

sculptor and Zveronika, for me it wasn't really a choice. My motherboard died, the tech guy replaced it with one that doesn't work with Windows 7 so I had to upgrade to Windows 10, and then I had to upgrade Corel as well. I think there is utility in keeping up with software updates, but there are definitely more upgrades being offered than we need and if you have software that works for you, stay with it for as long as it continues to work. If I could still use CorelDraw X3 I would be happy, but it looks like I might be done with Corel.



DESIGNER
TomLon
2019-05-15

@Andre

True, Xara has several different programs.
In particular, for the logo design I currently use the Xara Designer Pro X9.



DESIGNER
sculptor
2019-05-16

Ajleroux, sorry to hear your story. I thought that you updated your Windows due to some security features or other concerns.

After you master new software I'm very interested to hear if it's as efficient as Corel when making new logos. Every logo we make needs certain time spent in:
- looking for concept
- drawing
- executing design/tweaking on computer

While first two steps involve creative process and can't be shortened - the third step should be very straightforward and time saving. With Corel I spend small fraction of time for logo execution. Most of the job is done without starring at the screen.

You still have a chance to use old version of Corel. You can try compatibility mode. If it doesn't work you can install Windows 7 in VirtualBox. https://www.groovypost.com/howto/setup-a-virtual-machine-to-run-older-or-incompatible-software-on-windows-10/

There are also new motherboards that have support for Windows 7 so you can install dual boot: Windows 10 and Windows 7. https://www.techpowerup.com/254481/biostar-announces-windows-7-support-for-latest-amd-and-intel-motherboards
I always have two systems installed on one computer for safety reasons. If one fails I still can access files from the other.



DESIGNER
singaraja
2019-05-16

Affinity Designer is really tempting!
I hope Adobe aware of this monopoly and reduce the subscription fee, otherwise Affinity Designer will be my tool! I give you 5 months maximum Adobe!



ADMIN
ajleroux
2019-05-16

Software renting like Adobe is doing can work, but then it must be coupled with frequent, significant updates or other tangible benefits. When paying for Netflix or paying my kids' school fees I can see what I get for my money. It is harder to pay monthly for software that looks virtually the same each month.

CorelDraw, Affinity Designer and Xara have their own strengths and weaknesses. If you're thinking of switching I would recommend downloading the free trials of all of them and testing for a few days to see which one works best for you.



DESIGNER
singaraja
2019-05-17

True! I been watching review about AD on youtube and most of them are a good review. If I have to make a switch maybe only illustrator. I am not sure about Photoshop competitor.



DESIGNER
logofish
2019-05-17

@Zveronika good idea! Once you have it, you can discover it when you want, taking your time. I have still to use it fully, because I've become somewhat more mentally conservative in using new software, but there are many things that are similar to Illustrator (and Corel Draw I guess) since the basic interface is common to all the vector drawing programs.

@singaraja There are also many Photoshop competitors out there. It really depends on what you use photoshop for; there is of course an Affinity competitor (Affinity Photo), but not free (I haven't used it so I don't really know how it is), and many free alternatives if you only have to perform basic operations like resize, crop and export.

For photo adjustments there's Adobe Lightroom, cheaper than Photoshop (has less functions), and if you dabble in UI design, Sketch has become an industry standard (but only for Mac).

The field where Adobe still dominates in my opinion is desktop publishing. Pages isn't a professional competitor and Quark Xpress is even more costly than inDesign (and a worse program according to many)



DESIGNER
singaraja
2019-05-18

@Logofish, I am just afraid all my mock up I bought is in vain after I switch.



DESIGNER
Zveronika
2019-05-19

Corel Draw has no mercy, 1 user - 2 installations, no matter how many of their products you have bought before, no matter how small business you have! :)



ADMIN
ajleroux
2019-05-19

It's a difficult balancing act for software companies. On the one hand they want to prevent piracy and get paid for their work. On the other hand they can't be so strict that they alienate paying customers. I think most companies (Corel included) are too paranoid.



ADMIN
ajleroux
2019-05-19

Sculptor, sorry I missed your earlier post. Thanks for the suggestion. I have tried compatibility mode (doesn't work) and I have considered VirtualBox, but it looks like Affinity Designer is going to be my solution.



DESIGNER
sculptor
2019-05-20

Ajleroux, That's great something works for you and you take it easy to switch. I'm stuck with Corel only because I put a lot of time (years) to learn how to use it efficiently. I have templates, brushes and some 3000 cdr files.

Might be that with other software learning comes must faster. By now I tried only Adobe Illustrator but I was shocked right in the beginning - there was no crop tool - only some funky clipping masks.



DESIGNER
Ortega Graphics
2019-05-20

@Sculptor, Adobe Illustrator has the equivalent of CorelDraw's crop tool; it is called Pathfinder (Shape Modes + Pathfinder). Additionally, Adobe Illustrator has a very intuitive tool to combine shapes called Shape Builder. Both tools are very powerful.



DESIGNER
sculptor
2019-05-20

Ortega, maybe this is more about psychology than a math - just like the word "intuitive" suggest.

Crop tool is a good example. While Adobe Photoshop has crop tool Adobe Illustrator has pathfinder. I'm not a native English speaker. I take language very seriously. Word pathfinder sounds to me like a name of intergalaxy spaceship. When I want to crop I look for a crop tool. You could kill me and skin me and I would never click "pathfinder" in this circumstances. What kind of intuition is that?

While vector art is a simple 2D thing - math - both Corel and AI make their best to stay as different as possible. They are like countries with imperial and metric measures. They don't want to make things simple. Internet is full of Corel and AI users who don't understand each other.

There is also so called "industry standard". One company creates it and doesn't let others to comply with it. I have to to use AI to generate some eps files not because Canadians are stupid but because money talks louder.



DESIGNER
Ortega Graphics
2019-05-20

Hi Sculptor,

Yes, I definitely understand. It is very hard for humans to change habits; once we find something we like we stick with it. In Adobe Illustrator, I personally like the Pathfinder tool more than the Shape Builder tool. I learned the Pathfinder tool when it was first introduced (I think it was in the '90s), this was way before the Shape Builder tool was introduced and even though the latter is been called intuitive many times, I still use the former, just because I am used to it. And I definitely agree that the Pathfinder tool is not intuitive at all. As you might remember, I used to teach design (college level) and through the many years I taught, this was always one of the hardest concepts for students to grasp. I developed a series of very visual examples and exercises for them to better understand this tool. As for the name, I think they wanted to sound fancy. That's all.

Ortega Graphics



DESIGNER
sculptor
2019-05-21

Ortega, Thank you for this interesting insight. Now I see Adobe simply cares for you and other early users. That's fair enough and explains all these strange names and approaches.

You have to be a really good teacher if you have patience with guys like me. You reminded me how wrong I was in '90s thinking of computers only as a toys or a tools in less creative branches like accounting. I used to study physics in 80's but bought my first computer well after 2000 to make movies (it failed because movies are not like sculpture - you need actors). Next, I didn't believe in internet so I didn't care to have it. And now internet feeds me. Life simply gave me a lesson that I'm no prophet and that's kinda optimistic.



ADMIN
ajleroux
2019-05-21

Here are my test results for Affinity Designer:

When I first switched I was very impressed. As I worked with it more I became frustrated when I could not find things where they would normally be in CorelDraw. I took the time to customize Affinity Designer so that it feels like CorelDraw - things like the mouse wheel zoom and the shortcut keys that I am used to.

I found a really good 3 hour tutorial on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gd7FmjUxFnE
I worked through that entire tutorial, following along with every step. I said "wow" a lot. Affinity Designer is much more powerful than I realized. It has almost everything that CorelDraw has and a bunch of things that CorelDraw lacks.

The trick is to work through the initial learning curve. For example, the subtract tool in CorelDraw is also in Affinity Designer. The difference is that in CorelDraw the object you select first cuts the object you select last. In Affinity Designer the selection order does not matter, instead the object on top cuts the object below. If you don't know that it will seem like that tool is broken. There are many examples like this, meaning that you can't test it for just an hour or two and then quit when it becomes frustrating.

I used it daily for the 10 day trial period and yesterday I purchased it.

There are only two negatives that I found:

1. There are a few features in CorelDraw that Affinity Designer lacks, like lenses and the perspective tool. Not that these are crucial logo design tools.
2. Converting outlines to curves creates uneven curves. For example if you have a circle with an outline and you convert the outline to a curve, the resulting ring isn't perfect. The imperfection is extremely small, but it bugs me even if clients will never notice it.

All things considered, I think Affinity Designer is better than CorelDraw.

And it costs 10 times less.

Thanks again Logofish! ;)



DESIGNER
sculptor
2019-05-22

Ajleroux, Thank you. That's exactly what I inquired about - everyday use.
As for the details you mentioned:

1. I completely ceased to use perspective tool in Corel when I found that envelope tool can not only work as perspective but also can warp objects and groups. Hopefully you will find something like this in Affinity. I would miss it badly because it can correct whole drawing or bend some text in a jiffy.

2. I use this outline conversion very often. Sometimes I even change the weight of font with the use of outline. Maybe you could try first to convert outline to the bitmap and later to curve to make it more regular?

It would be also interesting to hear about tracing tool. I have to admit that AI tracing is far superior to Corel when it comes to tracing the high resolution pencil scans. When I want to use my pencil drawings directly I always go to AI. This is very serious difference and engines powering these tools must be totally different. I wonder how it works in Affinity - just a pencil drawing.



ADMIN
ajleroux
2019-05-22

Hi Sculptor,

1. No envelope tool unfortunately. They have had a mesh/warp tool on their roadmap of planned features since 2014. It is still not implemented and does not seem to be part of the upcoming V1.7 release judging by the beta release. Many people asking for it on the Affinity forums.

2. Converting the object to a curve and then converting the outline to a curve unfortunately doesn't improve things. Same problem. But like I said, the imperfection is very, very small. Turns out that the imperfection is more noticeable on small objects, so a workaround is to make the object big, convert outlines to curves, then shrink it down to normal size again. If you do that the imperfection will be virtually undetectable.

3. No auto-trace. This is also something that people are asking for on their forum. A few years ago I stopped using auto-trace completely. Even if you trace in Illustrator (I agree it traces way better than Corel) you still have a lot of clean-up work to do on all the lines. Now I just scan my drawings and then use a line drawing tool to manually trace them. Much faster and cleaner. Affinity has very good line drawing tools, including a vector brush and a pen pressure simulator where you can vary line thickness even when drawing with a mouse.

By the way...
I discovered that copy/paste from Corel to Affinity works pretty well. You can make something in Corel and simply paste it in Affinity. It remains an editable vector shape.
See: https://www.logoground.com/img2019/CoreltoAffinity.jpg

The reverse does not work. If you copy something in Affinity and paste it in Corel, Corel makes it a bitmap. To take something from Affinity to Corel you have to export to a common format like SVG, then import it in Corel.



DESIGNER
designerdahlia
2019-05-22

@ajleroux, regarding copy/paste from affinity to corel, try to check the box under preferences>general> copy items as svg in Affinity Designer. I don't have corel, so I can't test if this works.



ADMIN
ajleroux
2019-05-22

Hi designerdahlia,

Thanks for the tip. Unfortunately that didn't work. Corel still converts it to bitmap.



DESIGNER
logofish
2019-05-23

@ajleroux, I'm happy you found a good alternative to Corel! Wow, you are methodical in your learning process. I've just started lazily thinkering in Affinity for iPad but I know it will take a lot before I start using it decently.

From what I understand from your experience, Affinity looks more similar to Illustrator than Corel, since the pathfinder operations seem to have the same procedure (subtracting the top object from the bottom for example). At the moment I'm amazed by the stabilizer for the brush and pencil, which is at the end a smoothing tool but where it's easier to visualize the smoothing amount and workings. The outlining imperfection you cite sucks though.



DESIGNER
sculptor
2019-05-23

Ajleroux, you are absolutely right that when it comes to clean cut logo there is no tracing tool like hand. LG seems to prefer that style so I usually comply.
However I sometimes prefer the style of dirty ink drawings and when it comes to that, tracing from pencil drawing gives very good effects. True that there are bigger files but no anchor points stay in vain - they do their job. Here is example from my experience where pencil wagon was all traced in Adobe:
https://imgur.com/NQStizT

Can you make your own brushes and sprays in Affinity? They comes very handy when you for example make fur of the animal or leaves in the tree. Funny that I learned to use them pretty late after years of ignorance. Now I would miss it badly.



ADMIN
ajleroux
2019-05-23

logofish, you are right, it looks like Affinity was modeled on Illustrator. Probably to make the switch to Affinity easier for designers who are used to Illustrator.

Sculptor, there are a bunch of settings for brushes, including create, import etc., but I haven't experimented much with them.



DESIGNER
designerdahlia
2019-05-23

@sculptor you can make your own custom brushes in affinity but you have to export/import them as png files therefore you can't expand the strokes/curves for further editing. They're similar to the image brush in illustrator. The basic drawing brushes included in Affinity (round brushes) are true vector brushes though. They do have plans to improve the vector brush engine to include/support true vector based brushes later, as mentioned in their forum.



DESIGNER
sculptor
2019-05-24

Thank you for this detailed info. Looks like Affinity still has way to improve. In Corel I can turn any shape into brush stroke. After I use it - I mean when I make the actual stroke - stroke has a vector "skeleton" curve so I can reshape stroke that I've just made, change size, thickens, number of anchor points. I recommend brushes to anyone learning Corel Draw.

With that being said additional functions are not vital. They only cut time for certain, complicated designs. For someone who wouldn't use them much Affinity is probably a better bargain.



DESIGNER
herulogo
2019-05-26

i'm already bought "affinity designer" and amazing!, super thanks all in this forum


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